Friday, September 23, 2016

Language program: Arizona State University - Critical Languages Institute

Deadline: January 27, 2017

The Arizona State University Critical Languages Institute is accepting applications for its 2017 summer language programs in the U.S. and abroad. CLI offers intensive courses in less commonly taught languages in the U.S. and overseas. Students admitted to CLI pay a flat fee of $900 for up to 13 semester credits, in addition to study-abroad fees if they opt to study overseas.

Scholarships are available for undergraduate students, graduate students, and non-students: Department of State Title VIII Fellowships for selected languages, ROTC Project GO Scholarships for selected languages; Melikian Scholarships for all languages, and language-specific support for several languages. See http://cli.asu.edu for details.

Admission is competitive. The Deadline for funding and priority admission is January 27, 2017 (Jan 17 for Project GO).

COMBINATION COURSES:
2 months intensive study at ASU with optional 1 month study in country, providing 8–13 academic credits.
Albanian (ASU + Tirana)
Armenian (ASU + Yerevan)
Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian(ASU + Sarajevo)
Modern Hebrew (ASU only)
Indonesian (ASU + Bali)
Persian (ASU only)
Polish (ASU only)
Russian (ASU + Bishkek or St. Petersburg)
Turkish (ASU only )
Uzbek (ASU + Tashkent)
Sessions in ASU include daily co-curricular programming, grant mentoring and career planning opportunities.
Sessions abroad feature academically challenging study, extensive co-curricular programming integrated into academic coursework and conducted in 1-on-1 or small-group format by local activity guides.

OVERSEAS PROGRAMS

2-month intensive programs providing 8–10 academic credits
Albanian (Tirana) 2nd-year and up
Armenian (Yerevan) 2nd-year and up
BCS (Sarajevo) 2nd-year and up
Indonesian (Denpasar) 2nd-year and up
Russian (Bishkek) 2nd–4th-year
Russian (St. Petersburg) 5th–6th-year

Programs feature homestays, extensive co-curricular programming, integrated into academic coursework and conducted in 1-on1 or small-group format by local activity guides.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 27, 2017
APPLICATION AND FULL DETAILS:  (http://cli.asu.edu)

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

CFP: Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe

Deadline: April 10, 2017

We would like to invite you to submit articles to Miscellanea Posttotalitariana Wratislaviensia, a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Post-totalitarian Studies of the Institute of Slavic Studies (University of Wroclaw, Poland) and indexed in Czasopisma Naukowe w Sieci (CNS), The Central European Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities (CEJSH), and Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA, ProQuest). We are seeking for essays and reviews for an issue on Post-communist Children’s Culture in Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe, which will be devoted to mapping new phenomena in children’s literature and media culture that have emerged during the transition from late communism to late capitalism. As Anikó Imre argues in Globalization and the Transformation of Media Cultures in the New Europe (2009), children from Central, Eastern, and Southeast Europe are post-communist subjects for whom communism is an inherited memory, whose perspectives, values and skills differ from those of older generations, and whose subjectivities are developing in the shadow of adults’ anxieties about this divide. As sources of knowledge and social capital, children’s cultural products both reflect and attempt to resolve tensions caused by the formation of new individual and collective subjectivities. Exploration of regional, European and global affiliations shaping contemporary children’s culture in post-communist Europe offers a vital contribution to a broader inquiry into processes of cultural change and their significance for the formation of national identity in post-totalitarian countries. Contributions are welcomed from a range of fields, such as popular culture, new media, games, literature, education, and childhood.


Possible areas of investigation:
  • reflective and restorative nostalgia for communist children’s entertainment vs. technoeuphoria, neoliberalism, and the celebration of transnational mobility
  • childhood heritage 
  • globalization vs. localization
  • children’s culture and Eurocentric values (e.g. the “Catching up with Europe” project, a pan-European democracy, the EuropaGO project)
  • children’s relations with interactive media, peer-to-peer technologies and participatory culture
  • edutainment vs. centralized, nationalized and literature-based education
  • children’s culture and citizenship education
  • nationalisms, ethnocentrism, homophobia, misogyny, racism, and xenophobia in children’s culture
  • relations between children’s and adult media cultures
  • children’s books markets
  • promotion of children’s literature and culture

Essay should be sent to Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak (justyna.deszcz-tryhubczak@uwr.edu.pl) and Mateusz Świetlicki (mateusz.swietlicki@uwr.edu.pl) by 10th April 2017. Submissions should be 5000-6000 words. We will aim to reply to authors by 20th April 2017, with the aim of arranging reviews and completing revisions for 15th June and publication by the end of 2017. Please keep in mind that the essays must satisfy the formal requirements provided below.


Guidelines for Authors
  • The submitted text must be accompanied by an abstract and title of the article (max. 150 words); five key words; a biographical note (affiliation; title or degree; position held; research interests; current work address and email – max. 80 words).
  • The name(s) and affiliation(s) of the author(s) should be listed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page:
    • Marianna Zacharska
    • Uniwersytet Jagielloński (Kraków, Polska)
FORMATTING AND STYLE GUIDE
  • Standard printout: 30 lines per page; 60 characters per line (1800 characters with spaces per page); justified text; margins: top, bottom – 2,5; left – 3,5, right – 1,5
  • font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • title of the article – centered, font – 14 point size.
  • spacing: 1,5 in the main text; single spaced in the footnotes.
  • titles of literary works cited in the text for the first time should be accompanied by the original title (not in transliteration) and the date of publication in parentheses; titles of literary works should be italicized (do not use quotation marks).
  • quotations should be given in the original language (not in transliteration); longer quotations (more than 40 words) should be set apart from the surrounding text, in block format, indented from the left margin, and single spaced; font: 10 point size.
  • names appearing in the text for the first time should be given in full.

FOOTNOTES should be placed at the bottom of the page on which the reference appears. Use continuous footnote numbering.

a) bibliographic description in the footnotes should be given in the original language; please follow the examples:

Book:

J. Smith, History, Warsaw 2009, p. 25.
Ibidem, s. 15.
J. Smith, History, op. cit., p. 37.

Excerpts from publications of the same author
M. Shamone, Rap Culture, [in:] eadem, The History of Music, New York 2012, pp. 67-98.
Ibidem, p. 75.
M. Shamone, Rap Culture, op. cit., p. 90.

Chapter in a collective work

M. Blake, Feminism and Masculinity, trans. by I. Kurz,
[in:] Gender Studies, ed. A. Johnes et al. introduction by M. Sahara, London 2008, pp. 109-117.

Journal article:
E. Noovy, Jane Austen and Romanticisms „English Studies” 2006, no. 1, pp. 32-73.
e. Online journal article:
A. Adams, American History, „SSHA” 14 July 2013 [http://tssha.com/Society/69385/PrintView – accessed: 20.01.20013].


BIBLIOGRAPHY/REFERENCE LIST:
  • Reference list or bibliography should be included at the end of the text.
  • The word bibliography should be in bold and aligned to the left. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • List the sources in alphabetical order by the authors' last names.
  • All sources must be justified and 1.5–spaced. Font: Times New Roman in 12 point size.
  • Use: The Chicago Manual of Style

Job: Lecturer in Slavonic Languages (esp. Polish) and Linguistics - Oxford University, UK

Deadline: October 17, 2016

Please see the following link to apply: https://www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.display_form

The faculty are seeking to appoint to this 1-year post to undertake teaching and academic research in Slavonic languages (esp. Polish) and linguistics. The postholder will give 24 lectures or seminars per year; and 6 hours a week of undergraduate tuition in Slavonic linguistics and, if applicable, general linguistics across a number of colleges; they will also undertake advanced research and assist with administration, examining and admissions within the sub-faculty.

Applicants should possess a good undergraduate and Master's degree in Slavonic languages/linguistics; and should ordinarily have completed a PhD or DPhil in Slavonic linguistics/languages, although the committee may - in exceptional circumstances - consider applications from individuals due to submit their thesis by 1 January 2017. They should be able to provide evidence of an ability to teach undergraduates across a range of topics in Slavonic languages/linguistics; and evidence of an ability to produce high quality research in this area; and they should be fluent in English and Polish.

Additional information is available in the further particulars (available below) which all applicants are advised to consult.

The closing date for the post is 12.00 noon on Monday 17 October 2016.

CFP: ASN 2017 World Convention

Deadline: 27 October 2016

International Affairs Building,
Columbia University, NY
Sponsored by the Harriman Institute
4-6 May 2017


Contact information:
Proposals must be submitted to:
darel@uottawa.ca and darelasn2017@gmail.com


Over 150 PANELS in nine sections: 
  • Nationalism Studies
  • Migration & Diasporas
  • Balkans
  • Russia
  • Ukraine (and Belarus)
  • Central Europe (including Baltics & Moldova)
  • Eurasia (including Central Asia & China)
  • Caucasus (North and South)
  • Turkey and Greece (and Cyprus)
THEMATIC Panels on
  • The Conflict in Ukraine
  • Russia and the New Cold War
  • Internally Displaced People and Refugees
  • The Rise of the Far Right
  • Political Violence (Insurgency, Terrorism, War)
  • The Crisis in Turkey
  • The Political Use of Historical Memory

The Convention is also inviting paper, panel, roundtable, book, documentary, or special presentation proposals related to:

•“The Conflict in Ukraine,” on the domestic, regional and international crisis unleashed by Maidan, the annexation of Crimea, the war in Donbas, and the role of Russia, Europe and the United States;

•“Russia and the New Cold War,” on Russia’s involvement in international crises (i.e. Ukraine, Syria), authoritarianism, information warfare, geopolitics, NATO/EU, energy politics, sanctions, nationalism;

•“Internally Displaced People and Refugees,” on the refugee crisis in Europe, the Middle East and elsewhere, securitization of borders, human and civil rights;

•“The Rise of the Far Right,” on migration, multiculturalism, populism, nativism in Eastern/Western Europe and America,

•“Political Violence,” on insurgencies, civil wars, terrorism, the rise of ISIS, post-conflict settlement, international justice;

•“The Crisis in Turkey,” on the spectre of authoritarianism, the Kurdish question, Gulenism, the army and the state, refugees, the war in Syria, relations with Russia;

•“The Political Use of Historical Memory,” on the construction and contestation of the memory of historical events in sites, symbols, state and (social) media narratives, and academic research;


Prospective applicants can get a sense of the large thematic scope of ASN Convention papers and presentations by looking at the 2016 Final Program, which can be accessed at

http://nationalities.org/uploads/documents/ASN16_FinalProgram_April.pdf.


Proposal Information

The ASN 2017 Convention invites proposals for individual papers or panels. A panel includes a chair, three or four presentations based on written papers, and a discussant.


The Convention is also welcoming offers to serve as discussant on a panel to be created by the Program Committee from individual paper proposals. The application to be considered as discussant is self-standing, and does not apply to applicants already involved in individual or panel proposals. (At a later stage, many applicants whose proposals were accepted will be invited to serve as chair or discussant on other panels).

In order to submit proposals to the Convention, the three mandatory items indicated below (contact information, abstract, biographical statement) must be included in a single Word document (PDF documents will not be accepted) attached to a single email message. Applications containing more than one attachment will be returned.

Each applicant – including co-authors (unless they are not planning to attend the Convention if their proposal is accepted) and each member of a panel proposal – must also fill out a Fact Sheet online that can be accessed at

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ASN2017FS

Applicants that are on two proposals need to fill out two separate Fact Sheets.

IMPORTANT: Applicants can only send one paper proposal -- either as an individual proposal, or as a paper part of a panel proposal. If an applicant sends more than one proposal based on a written paper, neither will be considered. This applies to co-authors as well. A co-author can only appear on one proposal based on a paper. At the Convention, a panelist can only appear on a maximum of TWO panels, only one of which can be in the capacity of a paper presenter. For example, a panelist can be discussant or chair on a panel and present a paper on another, or chair a panel and be discussant in another, and so forth. This rule applies to co-authored papers. This means that applicants can appear on a maximum of two proposals sent to the Convention, only one of which can be in the capacity of a paper-giver.


Individual paper proposals must include four items:

Contact information: the name, email, postal address and academic affiliation of the applicant.
  • A 300- to 500-word abstract (shorter abstracts will not be considered) that includes the title of the paper.
  • A 100-word biographical statement, in narrative form (essentially one paragraph). Standard CVs will be rejected and the entire proposal must be sent in a single document.
Individual proposals featuring more than one author (joint proposal) must include
  •  The contact information and biographical statement of all authors and specify who among the co-authors intend to attend the Convention to present the paper. Only co-authors attending the Convention will have their names in the official program.
  • A Fact Sheet, to be filled out online (see above). In the case of co-authors, only those intending to attend the Convention must send a Fact Sheet. The Word document proposal must indicate that the Fact Sheet has been filled out online.
Panel proposals must include four items:
  • Contact information (see above) of all proposed panelists.
  • The title of the panel and the title and a 200- to 300-word abstract of each paper.
  • A 100-word biographical statement (see above) for each proposed panelist. Statements in standard CV format will not be considered. The rules on joint proposals are the same as with individual proposals (see above).
  • A Fact Sheet, to be filled out online (see above), for each panelist attached to the proposal. The Word document proposal must indicate that all panelists have filled out their Fact Sheet online.

Proposals for roundtables include a chair and four presenters, but no discussant, since the presentations, unlike regular panels, are not based on written papers. Roundtable proposals include the same four items as a panel proposal, including the title of each presentation, except that the 200- to 300-word abstracts are presentation abstracts, rather than paper abstracts.

The Convention is also inviting proposals for Book Panels, based on books published between September 2015 and February 2017. The proposal must include the Chair, three discussants, as well as the author. A Book Panel proposal must include the same four items as a panel proposal, except that the abstract is limited to a 200- to 300-word abstract of the book. The discussants need not submit an abstract. The organizer of a Book Panel might, but is not required to be the book’s author.

Proposals for documentaries must include four items:
  • Contact information (see above)
  • A 300 word abstract of the documentary
  • A 100-word biographical statement (see above). 
  • A Fact Sheet filled out online (see above).
  • A secure streaming link for reviewing purposes.

The ASN Documentary Festival prioritizes films longer than 50 minutes. Shorter documentaries will be considered.


Proposals to serve as a discussant must include four items:
  • Contact information (see above)
  • A 100-word statement about your areas of expertise
  • A 100-word biographical statement (see above). CVs will not be considered.
  • A Fact Sheet filled out online (see above)

Discussant proposals can only be sent by applicants who are not part of an individual or panel (or roundtable) proposal.
\
IMPORTANT: Participants are responsible for covering all travel and accommodation costs. Unfortunately, ASN has no funding available for panelists.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Funding: ASU Summer Language Study

Priority admission and funding application deadline: January 27, 2017.

The Arizona State University Critical Languages Institute (CLI) is pleased to announce the opening of admissions for its 2017 summer language and study abroad programs.

CLI offers intensive courses in 10 critical languages and study-abroad programs in 7 locations. Participants earn 8--13 credits and cover a minimum of 2 semesters of material.

Participants pay a flat fee of $900 (plus study-abroad fees if applicable) instead of tuition.

  • CLI also offers generous financial support, including:
  • Title VIII Fellowships for graduate students;
  • Project GO Scholarships for ROTC students;
  • Melikian Scholarships for Undergraduates and non-students;
  • ASU Jewish Studies Scholarships for Hebrew;
  • Birks Scholarships for Polish; and
  • Berkowitz Scholarships for Albanian.

Visit http://cli.asu.edu for details.

Prizes/Awards: Hungarian Studies Association "Mark Pittaway Article Prize" for best scholarly article in Hungarian studies

Deadline: October 15, 2016

The Hungarian Studies Association announces the Mark Pittaway Article Prize for best scholarly article in Hungarian studies to be awarded in November 2016.

The committee is seeking nominations of scholarly articles in Hungarian studies from any discipline, published in English in 2014 or 2015. (Articles with a publication date of 2016 will be eligible in 2018.) The goal of HSA prizes is to recognize quality scholarship in Hungarian studies. The prize committee particularly encourages nominations of new findings by junior scholars who expand the field and will benefit from the prize early in their careers. The article prize is named in memory of historian Mark Pittaway, who passed away in 2010. Send nominations, including a PDF of the article if possible, to Katalin Fábián (fabiank@lafayette.edu), Karl Brown (brownk@uww.edu), and Jeff Pennington (jpennington@berkeley.edu) by October 15th.

Prizes/Awards: Hungarian Studies Association "Mark Pittaway Article Prize" for best scholarly article in Hungarian studies

Deadline: October 15, 2016

The Hungarian Studies Association announces the Mark Pittaway Article Prize for best scholarly article in Hungarian studies to be awarded in November 2016.

The committee is seeking nominations of scholarly articles in Hungarian studies from any discipline, published in English in 2014 or 2015. (Articles with a publication date of 2016 will be eligible in 2018.) The goal of HSA prizes is to recognize quality scholarship in Hungarian studies. The prize committee particularly encourages nominations of new findings by junior scholars who expand the field and will benefit from the prize early in their careers. The article prize is named in memory of historian Mark Pittaway, who passed away in 2010. Send nominations, including a PDF of the article if possible, to Katalin Fábián (fabiank@lafayette.edu), Karl Brown (brownk@uww.edu), and Jeff Pennington (jpennington@berkeley.edu) by October 15th.